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St Teresa's Catholic Primary School and Nursery 3-11

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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium is (as taken from the Gov.uk website):

 

Purpose

The pupil premium grant is funding to improve educational outcomes for disadvantaged pupils in state-funded schools in England. In the financial year 2023-24, pupil premium spending will increase to almost £2.9 billion.

We want to support all schools to use the wealth of evidence of ‘what works’, evaluated by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF), to use this funding effectively.

 

Pupil Eligibility 

The following groups are eligible for pupil premium:

  • pupils who are recorded as eligible for free school meals, or have been recorded as eligible in the past 6 years, including eligible children of families who have no recourse to public funds (NRPF)
  • children looked after by local authorities, referred to as looked-after children
  • children previously looked after by a local authority or other state care, referred to as previously looked-after children

 

Funding rates for financial year 2023-24

This table shows how the pupil premium grant is allocated to schools and local authorities in financial year 2023-24, based on per pupil rates.

Pupil eligibility criteriaAmount of funding for each primary-aged pupil per yearAmount of funding for each secondary-aged pupil per yearFunding is paid to
Pupils who are eligible for free school meals, or have been eligible in the past 6 years£1,455£1,035School
Pupils previously looked after by a local authority or other state care£2,530£2,530School
Children who are looked after by the local authority£2,530£2,530Local authority

The government has permanently extended free school meal (FSM) eligibility to include children in all households with NRPF. These pupils should now be recorded as FSM eligible in the school census and their pupil premium eligibility will follow on from that automatically.

 

Funding paid to schools

To ensure that pupil premium is focused on effective approaches to raising the educational attainment of disadvantaged pupils, schools must use their pupil premium in line with the ‘menu of approaches’ set by the Department for Education.

The menu of approaches is in ‘Using pupil premium: guidance for school leaders.

The menu has been developed in line with the EEF’s 3-tiered approach to help school allocate spending across the following 3 areas:

  • supporting the high-quality teaching, such as staff professional development
  • providing targeted academic support, such as tutoring, including through the National Tutoring Programme
  • tackling non-academic barriers to academic success, such as difficulties in attendance, behaviour and social and emotional wellbeing

In line with the EEF’s recommended approach, schools should prioritise high-quality teaching, though the exact balance of spending between tiers will vary depending on the specific needs of pupils.

Pupil premium is not a personal budget for individual pupils, and schools do not have to spend pupil premium so that it solely benefits eligible pupils.

Pupil premium can be used to support other pupils with identified needs, such as pupils who have or have had a social worker, or pupils who act as a carer. It can also be used for whole class interventions, for example high-quality teaching, which will also benefit non-disadvantaged pupils.

High attaining eligible pupils should receive just as much focus as lower attaining eligible pupils when it comes to spending funding. Evidence shows that eligible pupils who are among the highest performers at key stage 2 are more likely than their non-eligible peers to fall behind by key stage 4.

 

Accountability

Schools must show how they are using their pupil premium effectively:

  • by publishing a statement on their website which presents an overview of their pupil premium strategy, and demonstrates that their use of the funding meets the requirements of the conditions of grant
  • through inspections by Ofsted - inspectors may discuss plans schools have to spend their pupil premium
  • through scrutiny of pupil premium plans by governors and trustees

Virtual school heads demonstrate to Ofsted how they are managing pupil premium for looked-after children in their virtual school annual report.

Schools are also held to account for the outcomes achieved by their disadvantaged pupils through published performance tables.

 

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